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Working a horse in cold weather can cause them to catch a chill.

We all know a horse will grow a thick winter coat to protect them from the seasonal weather.  The hair growth density, accompanied by tiny muscles will lift the hair, creating a layer of warm air and insulation preventing water and cold from reaching the skin.  In what is called piloerection.

Need your horse clipped?  I can help you click here.

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HOW DOES RIDING MY HORSE AFFECT THIS?

Sweat from a working horse comes out from the skin trapping moisture in the protective air pocket. When not dried properly your horse can quickly get a chill. A horse with a thick winter coat can take 2 to 3 times longer to cool out making the time needed to accomplish this quite extensive.

YOUR RIDING HABITS WILL DETERMINE THE BEST CLIP FOR YOU.

The less you work your horse the less hair needs to come off. There are many types of clipper blades, giving options to how much hair is clipped off. You can leave more “poof” or hair where you want.

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"Unclipped horses had a wet hair coat after exercise, but no moisture could be observed in clipped horses. It is possible that sweat rapidly evaporated from the naked skin thereby efficiently preventing overheating due to exercise. It could explain the unchanged rectal temperature and lower respiratory frequency in clipped horses. However, sweat rate was not measured and it can therefore not be excluded that non-evaporative heat dissipation in the cool ambient temperature was sufficient to prevent an increased rectal temperature. Whichever the explanation, the horses seemed to benefit from clipping since they did not need to mobilize heat dissipating mechanisms." -- US National Library of Medicine (link)